Paul van Gerven
5 April

Research center Differ, VU Amsterdam and start-up Chromodynamics have received a 100,000 euro EU Attract grant to develop a ‘camera’ for determining chemical composition of materials and biological samples. The Ramantis system will be able to observe ten different wavelengths simultaneously, allowing for real-time 2D Raman Imaging. This technique, which produces a visual image of component distribution, currently takes up to several days.

The Ramantis builds on the Mantis system Chromodynamics CEO Wouter Vijvers developed as a postdoc at Differ. The Mantis was designed for monitoring plasma purity at the ITER nuclear fusion reactor, but its underlying principles can be applied to medical and industrial imaging applications as well. Chromodynamics recently also came in second at the Golden Lightbulb Challenge, a start-up competition organized by the Eindhoven University of Technology.