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Qutech may have solved the quantum computer’s nasty cable problem

Cables are getting in the way of building more powerful quantum computers. By creating qubits that work above absolute zero, Qutech and Intel raise hopes of integrating quantum hardware and their classic control electronics.

Headlines

ASML bags 4.3 billion dollar EUV order from Hynix
A peak inside Samsung’s EUV-made DRAM chips
Eleo gets recharged with Lumipol investment
Holst Centre breaks through with next-generation ultrasound monitor
ASML and Imec take EUV patterning to the limit
VLSI goes quantum in EU Flagship project
Elusive amorphous perovskites may increase solar cell efficiency
Imec finds energy-consumption milestone with new UWB transmitter chip
ASML’s Van den Brink and Imec’s Van den hove inducted into National Academy of Engineering (update)
Report: EU getting more serious about building a European fab
Rob Postma takes the controls at Airbus NL
E-Magy energized with 5 million in funding
Nexperia bets big on boosting manufacturing and R&D

From Engineer of the Year to bankruptcy

Maja Rudinac did everything possible for her innovation, the Lea care robot. All lights were green, everyone loved the product and still, it didn’t make it.

In other news

Samsung and Xilinx partner on 5G chips (Venturebeat)
Operating Mars rovers from home (The Verge)
Google’s head of quantum hardware resigns (Wired)

AI engineering: making AI real

Building and deploying production-quality, industry-strength ML/DL systems require AI engineering as a discipline. These are the key research challenges that need to be addressed to allow more companies to transition from experimentation and prototyping to real-world deployment.