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Qutech may have solved the quantum computer’s nasty cable problem

Cables are getting in the way of building more powerful quantum computers. By creating qubits that work above absolute zero, Qutech and Intel raise hopes of integrating quantum hardware and their classic control electronics.

Headlines

Dutch forensic lab first to decrypt Tesla’s driving data
ASML experiencing growing pains
Government scrutinizes security ramifications of High Tech Campus deal
Kitepower’s first airborne wind energy system lifts off in Aruba
EC accelerates Hardt Hyperloop with €15M investment
Novel-T and Imec.istart team to accelerate Dutch tech startups
Midiagnostics to commercialize Imec’s Covid-19 breathalyzer test
Dutch want photonics, AI and quantum in European Chips Act
Axelera AI attracts CTO from IBM Zurich
Samsung increases EUV layers in DRAM to five
Nvidia’s takeover of Arm dealt blow by EU
Hiber’s IoT service links with the UK’s Inmarsat Elera network
Mass production of Samsung’s 3nm node moved to next year

From Engineer of the Year to bankruptcy

Maja Rudinac did everything possible for her innovation, the Lea care robot. All lights were green, everyone loved the product and still, it didn’t make it.

In other news

Samsung and Xilinx partner on 5G chips (Venturebeat)
Operating Mars rovers from home (The Verge)
Google’s head of quantum hardware resigns (Wired)

AI engineering: making AI real

Building and deploying production-quality, industry-strength ML/DL systems require AI engineering as a discipline. These are the key research challenges that need to be addressed to allow more companies to transition from experimentation and prototyping to real-world deployment.