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Qutech may have solved the quantum computer’s nasty cable problem

Cables are getting in the way of building more powerful quantum computers. By creating qubits that work above absolute zero, Qutech and Intel raise hopes of integrating quantum hardware and their classic control electronics.

Headlines

Qutech and co want to quantum-connect the Randstad
Neways acquiesces to automotive angst, axes 250
Academic Startup Competition announces its top 10
Ebusco and Rocsys link up for automated bus depots
Applied Materials bumps ASML back to runner-up in semi equipment market
Fastned lands France and €17M for further growth
TU Delft working on smart and communicative solar cells
Chip industry to grow 6 percent, top 15 by twice as much
Imec and KU Leuven flout Tesla’s keyless entry
Plant imaging goes low code
Grai Matter Labs gets $14M boost to edge AI
Major setbacks in China’s efforts to boost chip industry
TUE turns up the heat on e-waste

From Engineer of the Year to bankruptcy

Maja Rudinac did everything possible for her innovation, the Lea care robot. All lights were green, everyone loved the product and still, it didn’t make it.

In other news

Samsung and Xilinx partner on 5G chips (Venturebeat)
Operating Mars rovers from home (The Verge)
Google’s head of quantum hardware resigns (Wired)

AI engineering: making AI real

Building and deploying production-quality, industry-strength ML/DL systems require AI engineering as a discipline. These are the key research challenges that need to be addressed to allow more companies to transition from experimentation and prototyping to real-world deployment.