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Game of marbles

Over the last four years, TUE researchers have been developing smart marbles, sensors to explore hard-to-reach and even inaccessible environments. Meanwhile, on the other side of the Atlantic, Ingu Solutions is deploying a strikingly similar solution.

Headlines

Dutch forensic lab first to decrypt Tesla’s driving data
ASML experiencing growing pains
Government scrutinizes security ramifications of High Tech Campus deal
Kitepower’s first airborne wind energy system lifts off in Aruba
EC accelerates Hardt Hyperloop with €15M investment
Novel-T and Imec.istart team to accelerate Dutch tech startups
Midiagnostics to commercialize Imec’s Covid-19 breathalyzer test

Hot electrons give up the goods

Harvesting the energy of so-called hot electrons in perovskites is surprisingly easy, suggests a study by the University of Groningen and Nanyang Technological University. The finding may help to increase the efficiency of perovskite solar panels.

In other news

Predicting people’s driving personality (TU Delft)
Musk says sledgehammer weakened Cybertruck’s windows (Techspot)
Intel picks Mediatek as 5G PC modem supplier after selling chip unit (Venturebeat)

Direct digital transmitters pave the way for 5G

With the rapidly growing need for higher bandwidth and higher system efficiency/integration, direct digital transmitters are gaining more attention to accommodate the demanding requirements of 5G and other advanced wideband applications.